that's forking good

adventures in a culinary neophyte's kitchen

in need of some snickers…

Posted by culinaryneophyte on July 30, 2011

I had a little bit of a mishap the other day — not of the culinary kind, but the technological. See, I’m a bit of an organization freak, so when I find a recipe online, I don’t just ‘favorite’ it and come back later; I copy it into the appropriate draft in my Gmail box (one of about 57 running drafts), label it and index it based on categories and ingredients. This way, when I have excess of something like, say, green onions, a simple CTRL F gives me 10 useful recipes I was already interested in trying. When I make one of said recipes, that link and my notes on the execution end up in a different set of drafts. Easy enough, right?

But then tragedy struck. Upon recently entering a completed dessert recipe, I must have highlighted my entire draft and pasted in the new link and notes on top of it, thus unknowingly erasing everything in the draft except for that one entry. I hit ‘save’ and went on my merry way, not realizing until this week that I essentially deleted six months of desserts and my ‘memories’ of making them. Devastating. All that’s left to remind me what I made are my saved photos, so hopefully things will start to come back to me.

In perusing my pics, I found a little photo shoot I set up after slaving over some experimental snickerdoodle cupcakes. I figured if my exposition were subpar because of this draft debacle, at least the food would be pretty.

These cupcakes were really good. I adapted a few recipes I found (one was definitely Martha’s), and took three different approaches to the end product: one glazed, one frosted, one glazed and frosted.

♦3 c. flour
1/2 tsp. salt
1 tbs. baking powder
1 tbs. cinnamon
2 sticks butter
1-3/4 c. sugar
4 eggs
2 tsp. vanilla extract
1-1/4 c. milk
Frosting (see below)
Light corn syrup (optional, see below)

Combine flour, salt, baking powder and cinnamon in a bowl. In a stand mixer, cream butter and sugar until fluffy. Add eggs one at a time, beating in between each. Add vanilla. On low setting, add one-third dry mixture, then half the milk, and repeat. Continue beating until well combined, but do not overmix. Pour into cupcake liners, and bake at 350 degrees for 17-20 minutes.

I uncharacteristically took a shortcut here and used store-bought icing (I was making these for a birthday gathering, and really didn’t have a lot of time to spare), but I encourage you to make your own. For buttercream, try this one sans the spices; for cream cheese, try this one.

For the glazed cakes, I combined 1 tsp. of cinnamon and a 1 tsp. of sugar in a small bowl. In a separate bowl, I poured about three tablespoons of light corn syrup, brushed each cupcake with the glaze and rolled the top in the cinnamon sugar. For the frosted cupcakes, I piped on the frosting and dusted each cupcake in the aforementioned cinnamon sugar. For the third lot, I combined the two techniques.

Total time? 20 minutes prep, 20 minutes bake.
Cost? $2 frosting (or related frosting-making materials), $1 eggs, $1.75 light corn syrup (optional)
Overall success relative to expectations? 7 out 10. From what I remember (no notes, grrr), these were a little more muffin-like than I would have preferred, but they were still tasty. Obvious point deduction for the store-bought frosting, but +1 for appearance. No one I made these for can remember which variety they preferred (frosted, glazed, both), but for a more cupcake-y dessert, you need the frosting. The recipe yields two dozen, though, so feel free to experiment like I did.

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